Spontaneous Recognition at Work | Leadership

Recognition at Work

Reward and retention is a very hot area at the moment. There are real skills shortages and it is essential that organisations move strongly to retain good, solid performers as well as their high performers. Much of this is handled in a planned manner, and maybe even managed centrally. However, it is also critical that the spontaneous recognition of continuous strong performance, as well of individual acts that go beyond your expectations.

How often do you thank your staff for good performance? A simple, sincere and appropriately given thank you is always welcomed, and there are times when you could do more.

For instance, do you have an under-achiever who has made progress and has surprised you with progress? This is a time when recognition can lead to continued change. If they have produced some great work, a pat on the back and a well done may be the impetus for them to continue working to improve performance.

Do you have a quiet achiever, a solid performer, who always completes work well and on target? They also need recognition and reward, and it is motivating and engaging for the staff member.

Motivation and thanks go hand in hand. If a person is never recognised for going that extra mile there is no incentive to continue.

How do you go about rewarding good performance?  What is appropriate for the office? Suit the type of recognition and reward to the individual. Some will prefer quiet, non-public thanks. For others, more public recognition is appreciated.

In either case, make sure to tell your achiever, face to face – eyeball to eyeball – how much you appreciate their efforts and the difference it has made to the team, the unit or the organisation.

It is easy to overlook the employee who constantly works to a high level. These are the people you want to keep within your organisation, so also take the time to thank them appropriately.

There are many thoughts about appropriate spontaneous rewards. For this type of reward, experience shows that it does not have to be large. Common rewards include movie tickets, meal vouchers, gift certificates, plaques and certificates and corporate gift items.

Some thoughts for you:

  • When was the last time you rewarded good performance in your team?
  • When was the last time you were rewarded for your performance?
  • What is it that you need to put in place?

By our Client Manager, Di Franklin.

Can we help?

If you would like assistance with managing staff or building leadership skills, give us a call.

Indra Process and Performance Consulting
www.indraconsulting.com

All articles that appear on Indra Process and Performance Consulting’s blog are copyright Indra Process and Performance Consulting.

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